IFOM DIYscience

DIYscience Discover your hidden scientist!

Have you ever tried to do a science experiment at home? Have you ever tried to make a chemical reaction or to grow a crystal?
You don’t need leading-edge laboratories or complex equipment to have a first-hand experience in science. You can do science with everyday materials that you can even find at home: this is the Do It Yourself philosophy!
What you need are a pinch of creativity, a dash of passion and the DIYscience collection that we had prepared for you!
Try these simple experiments and find out how fun and engaging science can be!

Balloons and electricity

Have you ever got a small electric shock? Static electricity is due to the accumulation of electric charges on the surface of an object. Find out how to generate it and how to use it in these simple experiments!

static electricity . physics . balloon

Racing colours

Can you distinguish primary from secondary colours? By using water and a piece of paper you can separate the inks of your felt tip pens in order to see how many colours they contain. Find out how to perform this simple chromatography!

chromatography . chemistry . capillarity

Hidden messages

Have you ever send a secret message written with an invisible ink? Some molecules change their colour according to the acidity of the environment in which they are. Find out how chemistry can help you in hiding a secret message!

pH . chemistry . acidity

Popping vinegar

When you mix different materials, they can dissolve or not or they can even give rise to something new. Find out what happens when you mix vinegar and baking soda in a plastic bag … is there enough space for it all?

chemical reactions . vinegar . baking soda

Walking water

Glasses, water, paper and some food colouring: that’s what you need to experience one of the most intriguing phenomena in biology. We are talking about capillarity: the force that drives water along roots and trunks, even against gravity!

capillarity . chemistry . water properties

Swimming fishes

Some insects are able to float and stride on a water surface: magic? No, physics! When they stand on a water surface, they are able to float due to the surface tension. Find out what it is with this simple experiment!

surface tension . physics . water properties

Milk vortices

What happens when milk runs into food colouring and dish detergent? With this experiment you can try to produce colourful vortices taking advantage of a special force, the surface tension, which creates thin films over the surface of liquids.

surface tension . physics . water properties

Crystals and salt

Who says that it is possible to produce crystals only in a lab? What you need is just a glass of water and some salt … and with a pinch of patience you will be able to grow wonderful salt crystals. Why don’t you try?

states of matter . crystals . salt

Plastic milk

Have you ever built a key chain with milk? Hard work? Not at all! All you need is to know the milk composition and the chemical reaction that will allow you to transform milk into something different. Ready to start?

Chemical reactions . vinegar . milk

Solid or liquid?

Sometimes it behaves like a liquid, sometimes like a solid. No, it’s not a riddle! It’s a feature of some special fluids, called “non-Newtonian” fluids. Follow the instructions, prepare your own non-Newtonian fluid and try to handle it gently or with more energy!

States of matter . physics . starch

A matter of affinity

What happens when you mix water and oil or water, oil and alcohol? Do they mix together or not? And which of them have more affinity? Find out how to explore density and polarity using everyday materials!

density . affinity . polarity

Fizzy balloons

How many methods do you know to inflate a balloon? We try to do it using a chemical reaction and mixing different materials. Find out how to inflate a balloon with this simple experiment and enjoy with your kids!

chemical reactions . vinegar . baking soda

Blooming flowers

What do biscuits dunk in milk and blooming flowers have in common? They both have to deal with capillarity, a physical phenomenon that is very common in our everyday life. Discover it through this simple experiment!

capillarity . physics . water property